Rob Hall Film Editor

Agent: APA   -   Matt Birch   -   +1 310-888-4200   -   mbirch@apa-agency.com

FIVE GOLDEN RULES OF THE CUTTING ROOM

Rob Hall    -    Film Editor    -    tel: +44 (0)7986 049 658    -    roberto2104@email.com

Working in the cutting room can be a high-pressure environment, with long hours

and no room for error. To this end, there are five basic rules of working that must

always be adhered to:

1. ALWAYS SHOW UP ON TIME.

Plan your journey to work to arrive early so that delays can be accommodated (to

an extent) without arriving late.

2. WRITE IT DOWN.

When receiving information from the editor, or the other members of the production or

post-production team, always write it down so it will not be forgotten or overlooked.

3. IF YOU DON’T KNOW, ASK. NEVER GUESS.

I’d rather be asked many times a day how to do something rather than have a task

attempted by guesswork. Of course, it shouldn’t need to be the SAME question each

time if rule no.2 is followed.

4. SLOW AND CORRECT ALWAYS BEATS FAST AND WRONG.

Don’t compromise work by rushing it and making mistakes - and be realistic with your

time management accordingly.

5. EVERYBODY MAKES MISTAKES BUT THE CUTTING ROOM LOOKS PERFECT.

This is because NOTHING should EVER leave the cutting room without being properly

checked. Perhaps the most important of the five rules.

These rules should be the foundation of your professional practice in the cutting room,

without exception. It should always be remembered that this is a highly competitive

industry and if you don’t set your standards high enough, there are a vast number of people

who are willing to do so.

Rob Hall Film Editor

Agent: APA - Matt Birch

+1 310-888-4200

mbirch@apa-agency.com

Rob Hall - Film Editor

tel: +44 (0)7986 049 658   -   roberto2104@email.com

FIVE GOLDEN RULES OF

THE CUTTING ROOM

Working in the cutting room can be a

high-pressure environment, with long hours

and no room for error. To this end, there are

five basic rules of working that must always

be adhered to:

1. ALWAYS SHOW UP ON TIME.

Plan your journey to work to arrive early so

that delays can be accommodated (to an

extent) without arriving late.

2. WRITE IT DOWN.

When receiving information from the editor,

or the other members of the production or

post-production team, always write it down

so it will not be forgotten or overlooked.

3. IF YOU DON’T KNOW, ASK. NEVER GUESS.

I’d rather be asked many times a day how to

do something rather than have a task

attempted by guesswork. Of course, it

shouldn’t need to be the SAME question each

time if rule no.2 is followed.

4. SLOW AND CORRECT ALWAYS BEATS

FAST AND WRONG.

Don’t compromise work by rushing it and

making mistakes - and be realistic with your

time management accordingly.

5. EVERYBODY MAKES MISTAKES BUT THE

CUTTING ROOM LOOKS PERFECT.

This is because NOTHING should EVER leave

the cutting room without being properly

checked. Perhaps the most important of the

five rules.

These rules should be the foundation of your

professional practice in the cutting room,

without exception. It should always be

remembered that this is a highly competitive

industry and if you don’t set your standards

high enough, there are a vast number of

people who are willing to do so.